Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • November 14, 2018
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Scientists are leveraging advances in nanotechnology and the unique properties of messenger RNA to inhibit the growth of cancer cells by targeting tumor suppressors, which are genes that help cancer cells grow unchecked.

  • October 29, 2018
    (Funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology)

    It loops, folds, sticks to itself, and contorts into shapes as intricate as a smiley face—all within the confines of a region one-thousandth the diameter of a human cell. 

  • October 29, 2018
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Physicists from the University of California, Irvine have discovered a new way to control magnets at the nanometer scale by electric current.

  • October 29, 2018
    (Funded by the Office of Naval Research and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Researchers have devised a system that could let tiny cameras detect where light is coming from without using a large lens.

  • October 28, 2018
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have engineered a new type of molecular probe that can measure and count RNA in cells and tissue without organic dyes. The probe relies on compact quantum dots to illuminate molecules and diseased cells rather than fluorescent dyes.

  • October 26, 2018
    (Funded by the Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Researchers have made tellurium, a rare metal, into a film less than a nanometer thick. The resulting material, tellurene, shows promise for next-generation, near-infrared solar cells, and other optoelectronic applications that rely on the manipulation of light.

  • October 25, 2018
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Crude oil often clogs filters membranes used in the oil and gas industry. To address this problem, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have developed a novel approach, which will prolong the lifetime of key industrial equipment. Much of the work was performed at the Center for Nanoscale Materials, which is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science.

  • October 25, 2018
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Institutes of Health)

    Scientists have discovered that coating a lithium metal foil with a multi-walled carbon nanotube film could be key in building a longer-lasting battery. The researchers used the nanotube films to halt the growth of dendrites on a battery's unprotected lithium metal anodes.

  • October 23, 2018
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Most synthetic nanoparticles are quickly cleared in the bloodstream before reaching tumors. But researchers have shown how polymer shells can be used to cloak nanoparticles in the bloodstream and prevent them from being taken up by the immune system and liver — the body’s primary screeners for removing harmful intruders from circulation.

  • October 16, 2018
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers from Brown University have developed a new alloy catalyst that both reduces platinum use and holds up well in fuel cell testing. This result is significant because the cost of platinum is high, which is holding back the widespread use of eco-friendly hydrogen fuel cells in cars, trucks and other vehicles.

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