Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • March 20, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Physicists at the California Institute of Technology have designed a method that theoretically could levitate and propel objects using only light waves. The team believes that the method would lead to the development of a light-powered spacecraft that can travel to the nearest planet outside of the solar system.

  • March 19, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Using nanotechnology, University of Central Florida researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers. The new technique requires only a few drops of blood, and results are available in minutes instead of hours, because no separate lab is necessary to process the sample.

  • March 19, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Army Research Office)

    Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a new way of measuring atomic-scale magnetic fields with great precision, not only up and down but sideways as well. The new tool could be useful in applications as diverse as mapping the electrical impulses inside a firing neuron, characterizing new magnetic materials, and probing exotic quantum-physical phenomena.

  • March 15, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation)

    A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color, and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

  • March 15, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy. Biological sensors monitor small molecules, ions, and protons and are vital as medical diagnostic tools.

  • March 14, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have engineered living cells so they can act as a starting point for building composite materials. Using living cells as "materials scaffolds" could lead to a new class of materials, called engineered living materials, that might open the door to self-healing materials and other applications in bioelectronics, biosensing, and smart materials.

  • March 13, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    By introducing defects into the structure of a metal-organic framework, Rice University researchers found they could increase the amount of toxic pollutants called perfluorooctanesulfonic acid that the metal-organic framework could hold, as well as the speed with which it could adsorb them from heavily polluted industrial wastewater.

  • March 13, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have demonstrated how nanoscale defects can enhance the properties of an ultrathin, so-called 2-D material.

  • March 08, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Office)

    Scientists have discovered an easier way to produce an infrared camera than the current methods. This novel method may one day lead to much more cost-effective infrared cameras, which, in turn, could enable infrared cameras for common consumer electronics and sensors to help autonomous cars see their surroundings more accurately.

  • March 07, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers at the University of Minnesota have combined graphene with nano-sized ribbons of gold to create an ultrasensitive biosensor that could help detect very small amounts of misfolded proteins, which are the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, Chronic Wasting Disease, and mad cow disease.

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