Prioritization of Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials (2007)

Subject Area:
NNI Publications and Reports
EHS-related Documents
Author: Nanotechnology Environmental and Health Implications Working Group; Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology Subcommittee; Committee on Technology; and the National Science and Technology Council
Publication Date: Aug. 16 2007

Description:

The September 2006 NNI document EHS Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials, identified five broad categories of Federal environmental, health, and safety (EHS) research and information needs. It also defined 75 specific needs related to risk assessment and management of nanoscale materials and provided principles for prioritizing EHS research.

The interagency Nanotechnology Environmental and Health Implications (NEHI) Working Group solicited public comment on the prioritization principles and continued to assess the research needs. As a result, the Working Group refined the prioritization principles and reorganized – and in some cases revised slightly – the statement of the research needs and categories. The Working Group used the updated principles to identify five priorities within each of the five categories of EHS research and information needs. This document defines these 25 priorities along with the revised principles and the process used for prioritizing EHS research needs.


Nanotechnology Fact

Although federally-funded R&D yields hard-to-quantify benefits such as students educated, degrees conferred, companies started, patents and copyrights granted, developmental partnerships formed, and private sector investment inflows, there are many indicators of the impact of this ­­­­­investment.

For example, there are over 1,900 U.S.-based companies conducting R&D, manufacturing, or product sales in nanotechnology in 2016. Of these companies engaged in the nanotechnology sector, over 36% have participated in the Small Business Innovation Research or Small Business Technology Transfer programs funded by the Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative. The most recent Business R&D and Innovation Survey (BRDIS) conducted by the National Science Foundation (NSF) found approximately 1,500 companies engaged in nanotechnology with approximately 1,100 of these classified as small businesses (less than 500 employees). The difference in the number of companies cited above can be attributed to the year the data was collected and other methodologies.

A noteworthy impact of the NNI has been the focused investment by NNI-participating agencies in the establishment and development of multidisciplinary research and education centers devoted to nanoscience and nanotechnology. NNI agencies have developed an extensive infrastructure of nearly 100 major interdisciplinary research and education centers and user facilities across the United States. This cutting-edge fabrication and characterization equipment provides state-of-the-art nanoscience tools and expertise for research by non-profit or business organizations, whether small or large, for use-inspired research and some of the user facilities are available free-of-charge for non-proprietary work if the user intends to publish the research results in the scientific literature.

In December 2015, Lux Research estimated that nanotechnology-enabled products generated $1.6 trillion in global revenues in 2014; and that figure is anticipated to increase to $3.5 trillion in 2018.

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