Workshop Proceedings-- U.S.-EU: Bridging NanoEHS Research Efforts Joint Workshop (Dec 2-3, 2013)

Subject Area:
NNI Publications and Reports
NNI Workshop Reports
Author: National Nanotechnology Initiative & European Commission
Publication Date: Feb. 6 2015

Description:

This is the workshop report for the third in an annual series of U.S.–EU nanoEHS workshops. The purpose of this third joint workshop was to further deepen and promote EU-U.S. collaboration on nanotechnology-related environment, health, and safety (nanoEHS) research. Additionally, the aim was to publicize progress toward Community of Research (COR) goals and objectives, clarify and communicate future plans, share best practices, and identify areas of cross-Community collaboration.

The 2013 U.S.–EU: Bridging NanoEHS Research Efforts joint workshop was held on December 2–3, 2013, at the National Science Foundation in Arlington, Virginia. The workshop was organized by the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) and the European Commission. Approximately 115 participants attended the meeting in person, and over a third of the attendees travelled from Europe. An additional 15 participants joined by phone. Attendees included scientists, policy makers, regulators, administrators, and authorities from the European Union and the United States.


Nanotechnology Fact

Nanoscale materials have been used for over a thousand years. For example, nanoscale gold was used in stained glass in Medieval Europe and nanotubes were found in blades of swords made in Damascus. However, ten centuries passed before high-powered microscopes were invented, allowing us to see things at the nanoscale and begin working with these materials.

Nanotechnology as we now know it began more than 30 years ago, when tools to image and measure at the nanoscale became available. Around the turn of the century, government research managers in the United States and other countries observed that physicists, biologists, chemists, electrical engineers, optical engineers, and materials scientists were working on interconnected, multidisciplinary issues emerging at the nanoscale. In 2000, the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) was created to help these researchers benefit from each other’s insights, accelerate technology development, and foster commercialization across disciplines.

To learn more, see What is Nanotechnology?

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