Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • October 11, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    Most attempts to turn textiles into wearable technology use stiff metallic fibers that alter the texture and physical behavior of the fabric. And coating methods that are successfully able to apply enough material to a textile substrate to make it highly conductive also tend to make the yarns and fabrics too brittle to withstand normal wear and tear. Now researchers at Drexel University have shown that they can create a highly conductive, durable yarn by coating standard cellulose-based yarns with a type of conductive two-dimensional material called MXene. Related video: https://youtu.be/Jxx3pAWvJqY

  • October 11, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Research Office, and the National Science Foundation)

    A Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists has, for the first time, unambiguously observed and documented the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moire superlattices – materials made by layering sheets of single-atom-thick materials on top of one another in precise configurations. The new findings will help researchers understand how to better manipulate materials into light emitters with controllable quantum properties.

  • October 10, 2019
    (Funded by the Army Research Laboratory)

    Bionanomotors, like myosins that move along actin networks in cells, are responsible for motion in all life forms. So the development of artificial nanomotors could make robots more effective and versatile teammates for soldiers in combat. This article describes the work of researchers from the Army Research Laboratory on identifying a design that would allow an artificial nanomotor to take advantage of Brownian motion, the property of particles to move because they are warm.

  • October 09, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the U.S. Army Research Office, the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy)

    A team of researchers has found a new way to produce a polymer material called PBO, a product known commercially as Zylon that's used in bulletproof vests and other high-performance fabrics. The new approach could be useful in making PBO products that resist degradation, a problem that has plagued PBO-based materials in the past.

  • October 09, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    When periodic arrays of metallic nanostructures are illuminated with light, each of the nanoparticles produces a strong response, which, in turn, results in enormous collective behaviors if all of the particles can interact. Scientists at The University of New Mexico have found that decreasing the density of nanoparticles in the array produces field enhancements that are not only larger, but extend farther away from the array.

  • October 08, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Research led by University of Texas at Dallas physicists has altered the understanding of the fundamental properties of perovskite crystals, a class of materials with great potential as solar cells and light emitters. In particular, the study presents evidence questioning existing models of the behavior of perovskites on the quantum level.

  • October 08, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Rice University scientists have transformed their laser-induced graphene into self-sterilizing filters that grab pathogens out of the air and kill them with small pulses of electricity. The flexible filter may be of special interest to hospitals.

  • October 04, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and The Chinese University of Hong Kong have developed a nanoscale 3-D printing technique that can fabricate tiny structures 1000 times faster than conventional two-photon lithography techniques, without sacrificing resolution.

  • October 04, 2019
    (Funded by the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Army Research Office)

    A variety of two-dimensional materials quickly degrade when exposed to oxygen and water vapor, and the protective coatings developed thus far are expensive and toxic and cannot be taken off. Now, a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and elsewhere has developed an ultrathin coating that is inexpensive, simple to apply, and can be removed by applying certain acids.

  • October 04, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers at Arizona State University are using a nanomaterial-welding method to make closing wounds and surgical incisions safer.

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