Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • June 28, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Office)

    A multidisciplinary team at Northwestern University and the University of Tennessee have developed a new technique, called variable temperature liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy, that allows researchers to examine nanoscale tubular materials while they are "alive" and forming liquids -- a first in the field.

  • June 27, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    Transitions from one state of matter to another—such as freezing, melting or evaporation—start with a process called "nucleation," in which tiny clusters of atoms or molecules (called "nuclei") begin to coalesce. Nucleation plays a critical role in circumstances as diverse as the formation of clouds and the onset of neurodegenerative disease. A UCLA-led team has gained a never-before-seen view of nucleation—capturing how the atoms rearrange at 4-D atomic resolution (that is, in three dimensions of space and across time).

  • June 27, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers @OregonState have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors. Magnetic nanoparticles have shown anti-cancer promise for tumors easily accessible by syringe, allowing the particles to be injected directly into the cancerous growth.

  • June 27, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Plant leaves are superhydrophobic, that is, they repel water and cleanse themselves from dust particles. Inspired by such natural designs, a team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to control the hydrophobicity of a surface to benefit the biomedical field.

  • June 26, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have taken the first images of carbon dioxide molecules within a molecular cage – part of a highly porous nanoparticle called a metal-organic framework, which has great potential for separating and storing gases and liquids.

  • June 26, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers from Brown and Columbia Universities have demonstrated previously unknown states of matter that arise in double-layer stacks of graphene, a two-dimensional nanomaterial. These new states arise from the complex interactions of electrons both within and across graphene layers.

  • June 24, 2019
    (Funded by the Army Research Laboratory)

    Researchers are working to develop nanophotonic devices that could have applications in thermal imaging and resonant filtering. Nanophotonic devices are used to shape the spectrum of light via photonic lattices and resonance, but their application generally has been limited to short wavelengths. The research team is trying to develop devices that will work in the long-wave infrared spectral region, which is the range in which thermal radiation is emitted.

  • June 24, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Office of Naval Research)

    Electrical engineers have reported solving a lingering question about how a two-dimensional crystal composed of cesium, lead, and bromine emitted a strong green light, opening the door to designing better light-emitting and diagnostic devices.

  • June 21, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Chemical engineers have devised a new way to create very tiny droplets of one liquid suspended within another liquid, known as nanoemulsions. The researchers also found a way to easily convert the liquid nanoemulsions to a gel when they reach body temperature, which could be useful for developing materials that can deliver medication when rubbed on the skin or injected into the body.

  • June 20, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency)

    Researchers have discovered a way to apply nanoparticles to plant leaves so that they travel through the plant all the way to the root. This is the first time that anyone has systematically studied how nanoparticles move through the leaf, into the plant, to the root, and exude into the soil.

Pages