NNI in the News

health work sprays person in full body protective gear
Scientists have developed membranes that produce a tiny bit of disinfecting hydrogen peroxide when exposed to light. They could find their way into food packaging as well, the researchers say, helping cut down on foodborne diseases.
Drawing of a quantum computing device
The concept involves a dense, three-dimensional circuit operating on an unconventional type of logic that could, theoretically, be packed into a block no bigger than 50 nanometers on any side.
The Structure of Paramagnetic Aggregates from Colloidal Emulsions (InSPACE) experiments explored nanoparticles suspended in magnetorheolocial fluids, a type of smart fluid that tends to self-assemble into shapes in the presence of a magnetic field.
The super-flexible nanogenerator demonstrated its great potential to work as a sensor capable of detecting the eye ball movement when it was attached on the surface of the eyelid for monitoring sleep pattern, tiredness, and possible brain activity.
A team of scientists and mathematicians are developing self-assembling, three-dimensional nanostructures that can be used for targeted drug delivery.
The New York Times talks to researchers from around the world about nanosensors for non-invasive disease diagnosis.
Kyle Nowlin from the University of North Carolina Greensboro Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering won the top honors for his image entitled Polymer Nanocone Array.
Researchers created thin-film organic transistors that could operate more than five times faster than previous examples of this experimental technology.
The cliffs of Dover? The caldera of Santorini? A terraced mountainside in Central Asia? Actually, it's the chipping at the edge of a silicon wafer when seen through a scanning electron microcope!
Football player and coach at practice
Engineers have now developed and tested a nano composite smartfoam that can be placed inside a football helmet (and pads) to more accurately test the impact and power of hits.

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