NNI in the News

Phys.org - September 12, 2019
(Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)
A Northwestern University research team has developed a new method for making catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells. The researchers also discovered that the method can take spent catalysts and recycle them into active catalysts.
Phys.org - September 05, 2019
(Funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)
When researchers want to edit, activate, or silence a gene in any living organism, they often turn to CRISPR/Cas9, a complex of RNA and protein that can act like a genetic Swiss Army knife. Now, Caltech researchers have applied principles from the emerging field of dynamic RNA nanotechnology to switch CRISPR/Cas9 from on to off and from off to on.
Science Codex - September 03, 2019
(Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)
Researchers at Rice University have developed a catalytic reactor that uses carbon dioxide as its feedstock and produces highly purified and high concentrations of formic acid. Tests have shown that nearly half of the electrical energy could be stored in formic acid as liquid fuel.
Phys.org - September 03, 2019
(Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)
Tools that detect cancer in its early stages can increase patient survival and quality of life. But cancer screening often calls for expensive equipment and trips to the clinic, which may not be feasible in some rural or developing areas. Now scientists have developed a simple and sensitive urine test that can produce a color change in urine to signal growing tumors in mice.
Phys.org - September 03, 2019
(Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)
Tools that detect cancer in its early stages can increase patient survival and quality of life. But cancer screening often calls for expensive equipment and trips to the clinic, which may not be feasible in some rural or developing areas. Now scientists have developed a simple and sensitive urine test that can produce a color change in urine to signal growing tumors in mice.
Physics World - August 31, 2019
(Funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration)
NASA scientists have demonstrated that electronic transistors made with nanoscale vacuum channels are immune to radiation damage – unlike transistors made with silicon, which are more common in today’s electronics. The scientists have shown that, with device structure innovations and a new material platform, nanoscale vacuum channel transistors could complement conventional silicon-based electronics for specific applications while being impervious to radiation exposure.
Nature - August 28, 2019
(Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Research Laboratory)
Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created the biggest computer chip yet made from carbon nanotubes: rolled up sheets of atom-thick graphene that conduct electricity at super-fast speeds. Some researchers hope that carbon nanotubes could be used in future computers, because they conduct electricity faster and more efficiently than silicon.
ScienceDaily - August 26, 2019
(Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)
Researchers have shown that multilayer graphene can provide a two-fold defense against mosquito bites. The ultra-thin yet strong material acts as a barrier that mosquitoes are unable to bite through. At the same time, experiments showed that graphene also blocks chemical signals mosquitoes use to sense that a blood meal is near, blunting their urge to bite in the first place.
ScienceDaily - August 26, 2019
(Funded by the National Institutes of Health)
Researchers have revealed previously unknown factors that contribute to the hardening of arteries and plaque growth, which cause heart disease. Their insight is the basis for a promising therapeutic approach to halt and potentially reverse plaque buildup and the progression of disease, the researchers said.
Science Codex - August 22, 2019
(Funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency)
A research team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology demonstrates the use of CRISPR as a control element in a new type of stimuli-responsive "smart" materials. Upon activation by DNA stimuli, a CRISPR-Cas enzyme enables smart materials to release fluorescent dyes and active enzymes, deploy encapsulated nanoparticles and live cells, or regulate electric circuits.

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