NNI in the News

Nature - August 28, 2019
(Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Research Laboratory)
Scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created the biggest computer chip yet made from carbon nanotubes: rolled up sheets of atom-thick graphene that conduct electricity at super-fast speeds. Some researchers hope that carbon nanotubes could be used in future computers, because they conduct electricity faster and more efficiently than silicon.
ScienceDaily - August 26, 2019
(Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)
Researchers have shown that multilayer graphene can provide a two-fold defense against mosquito bites. The ultra-thin yet strong material acts as a barrier that mosquitoes are unable to bite through. At the same time, experiments showed that graphene also blocks chemical signals mosquitoes use to sense that a blood meal is near, blunting their urge to bite in the first place.
ScienceDaily - August 26, 2019
(Funded by the National Institutes of Health)
Researchers have revealed previously unknown factors that contribute to the hardening of arteries and plaque growth, which cause heart disease. Their insight is the basis for a promising therapeutic approach to halt and potentially reverse plaque buildup and the progression of disease, the researchers said.
Science Codex - August 22, 2019
(Funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency)
A research team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology demonstrates the use of CRISPR as a control element in a new type of stimuli-responsive "smart" materials. Upon activation by DNA stimuli, a CRISPR-Cas enzyme enables smart materials to release fluorescent dyes and active enzymes, deploy encapsulated nanoparticles and live cells, or regulate electric circuits.
ScienceDaily - August 21, 2019
(Funded by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation)
A team of engineers at Tufts University has developed a transistor made from linen thread, enabling them to create electronic devices made entirely of thin threads that could be woven into fabric, worn on the skin, or even (theoretically) implanted surgically for diagnostic monitoring.
Phys.org - August 21, 2019
(Funded by the National Science Foundation)
UCLA researchers have developed a new technique for creating membrane filters that could offer a way for manufacturers to produce more effective and energy-efficient membranes using high-performance plastics, metal-organic frameworks, and carbon materials. To date, limitations in how filters are fabricated have prevented those materials from being viable in industrial production.
Nanowerk - August 19, 2019
(Funded by the National Institutes of Health)
Many diagnostic tests require blood, but researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a skin patch with tiny needles that painlessly collect interstitial fluid for testing. Diagnostic tests can measure trace amounts of essential proteins or hormones in the blood called biomarkers. High or low levels of biomarkers are specific indicators for a disease.
Phys.org - August 14, 2019
((Funded by the National Institutes of Health))
UCLA researchers loaded nanocapsules with the cancer-fighting drug rituximab to create a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier. The approach could be useful not only for cancers that metastasize to the central nervous system but also for primary brain tumors or other brain diseases.
Phys.org - August 13, 2019
(Funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health)
Researchers at Harvard have demonstrated genetically programmable self‐regenerating bacterial hydrogels that facilitate wound healing of internal surfaces like those of the gut.
Phys.org - August 12, 2019
((Funded by the National Science Foundation))
Researchers at MIT describe a simple solution to create carbon-nanotube based single-photon emitters, which are known as fluorescent quantum defects, at room temperature.

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