Nano Film Public Voting


Public voting is now open through February 1st.


3D Printed Microfluidic Channels

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This work demonstrates a simple method to fabricate 3D microchannels and microvasculature at room temperature by direct-writing liquid metal as a sacrificial template. The printed structures can be embedded in a variety of soft (e.g. elastomeric) and rigid (e.g. thermoset) polymers. Whereas conventional fabrication procedures typically confine microchannels to 2D planes, the geometry of the printed microchannels can be varied from a simple 2D network to complex 3D architectures without using lithography. The method produces robust monolithic structures without the need for any bonding or assembling techniques that often limit the materials of construction of conventional microchannels. Removing select portions of the metal leaves behind 3D metal features that can be used as antennas, interconnects, or electrodes for interfacing with lab-on-a-chip devices. This mechanism allows the rapid prototyping and development of personalized healthcare sensors that can be embedded in consumer-targeted wearable bio-monitoring devices.

 

Dishit Parekh, Advisor: Michael D. Dickey, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC
Laboratory website: www.che.ncsu.edu/dickeygroup/index.php
Funding Source: We are grateful for the support from the National Science Foundation for CMMI-1362284 and CAREER CMMI-0954321.

 

 

Response of crude and weathered oil slicks to FFT-SolutionTM dispersant in infrared imagery

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Response of crude and weathered oil slicks to the application of the FFT-Solution™ dispersant in infrared (IR) imagery. The crude oil slick almost instantaneously fragmented into narrow wedges and small drops within a few tenths of a second. This spectacular process is controlled by surface tension forces acting on a monomolecular (nano) scale. A new interpretation of the effect of dispersant on the oil dispersion process including capillary effects has been proposed, which is expected to lead to improved oil spill models and response strategies.
 

Professor Alexander V. Soloviev, Halmos College of Natural Science and Oceanography, Nova Southeastern University, Dania Beach, FL; Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
University of Miami, Miami, FL
Laboratory website: http://cnso.nova.edu/overview/faculty-staff-profiles/alexander_soloviev.html, https://www.rsmas.miami.edu/people/faculty-index/?p=brian-haus
Publication link:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015JC011533/full
Funding Source: Research was funded by the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE).

 

 

Portable Devices for Disease Diagnostics 

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Shrinking chemical instrumentation can show the same improvements that have revolutionized the computer industry. Faster, cheaper, and portable are some of these benefits. With the worlds analytical instrumentation market in the billions of dollars and only 0.1% using small biosensors there is a vast market growth potential and need, as the shortcomings with large instruments can be solved. Imagine the benefits to mankind from the ability to do an analysis anywhere in the world at any time! The possibilities are endless. Our research focuses on fabricating such a device for an array of diseases. Simply changing the capture molecule on the sensor surface dictates which disease is being tested for. Fabricated at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, these sensors fit in the palm of the hand. The biosensors work on the nanoscale by detecting biological molecules in very small amounts.
 

Taylor Mabe, Nanoscience Dept., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 
Jenna Schad, Biology Dept. & Film Dept., University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Laboratory website: Wei Group Website - https://sites.google.com/a/uncg.edu/wei-s-group-jsnn/home, Joint School of Nanoscience & Nanoengineering website - http://jsnn.ncat.uncg.edu
Funding Source: National Science Foundation, Program Manager Leon Esterowitz, Award Number 1511194