Listing of FY 2009 nanotechnology-related environmental, health, and safety research projects

Subject Area:
NNI Publications and Reports
EHS-related Documents
Author: NSET/NEHI
Publication Date: Oct. 20 2011

Description:

The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) requested that NNI agencies provide the NSET Subcommittee with detailed information on EHS research projects funded in FY 2009. These data were used to identify areas of strength or need when formulating the 2011 NNI EHS Research Strategy. Summaries of the data on these EHS projects are presented by core EHS research category in Chapters 2-6 of the NNI EHS Research Strategy, and six examples of research progress are highlighted in this document. A complete listing of the FY 2009 research projects is available here:  (1) totals of individual projects may vary from the summary tables due to rounding and (2) informatics and modeling is a new core area and so was not part of the data call. Please contact Liesl Heeter, NNCO, with questions about the tables.

The reader should note the difference between the scopes of the research included in this OMB-requested project data reported for FY 2009 and that reported for environmental, health, safety, and risk mitigation as a part of Program Component Area 7 in the annual NNI Supplement to the President’s Budget.

Further description of this data call is available in the NNI EHS Research Strategy, p. 7.


Nanotechnology Fact

Yes, nanotechnology is becoming ubiquitous in our daily lives and has found its way into many commercial products, for example, strong, lightweight materials for better fuel economy; targeted drug delivery for safer and more effective cancer treatments; clean, accessible drinking water around the world; superfast computers with vast amounts of storage; self-cleaning surfaces; wearable health monitors; more efficient solar panels; safer food through packaging and monitoring; regrowth of skin, bone, and nerve cells for better medical outcomes; smart windows that lighten or darken to conserve energy; and nanotechnology-enabled concrete that dries more quickly and has sensors to detect stress or corrosion at the nanoscale in roads, bridges, and buildings. By some estimates, revenue from the sale of nanotechnology-enabled products made in the United States has grown more than six-fold from 2009 through 2016 and is projected to exceed $500 billion in 2016.

For more information, see Benefits and Applications.

Stay Connected with the NNI

Sign up for Email Alerts and Updates.

NNI-Sponsored Contests:

student video contest logoenvisionano logo