News Highlights: Homepage Slideshow Archive

NREL bolsters batteries with nanotubes

Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are turning to nanotubes and rods to boost power and durability in lithium-ion batteries, the energy sources for cell phones, laptops, and electric vehicles. (Learn More >>)

3D Printed Nanostructured Materials Are Strong, Light, Have Many Uses

Engineers at MIT and Lawrence Livermore National Lab have devised a way to translate that airy, yet remarkably strong, structure down to the nanoscale — designing a system may set new records for stiffness for a given weight. (Learn More >>)

NY Times: Nanosilver May Help Provide a Path Away from Antibiotic Resistance

An NC State biomed professor tests a nanosilver-coated bandage on a persistent infection from a bug bite, instead of taking a course of oral antibiotics, and it worked. (Learn More >>)

Drug-Delivering Nanomotor is 500 Times Smaller Than a Grain of Salt

A group of engineers at the University of Texas have developed what they are calling the smallest and best such nanomotor ever built. (Learn More >>)

The business potential of (amazing, wonderful, futuristic) graphene

Fortune magazine reports: It's a better conductor. It's transparent. It's lightweight. It's strong. It's flexible and elastic. Can it change the electronics business? (Learn More >>)

New Apparel Could Ward Off Chemical Weapons

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, an NNI-member agency, engineered the nanotubes to hold a copper-based catalyst that breaks down a key chemical bond in nerve agents. (Learn More >>)

Scientists made color-changing paint out of gold nanoparticles

These sensors made of gold nanoparticles change colors as you press on them. They can be painted on or applied like a bandage, and they convey differences in pressure at certain points of impact. (Learn More >>)

MIT attempts to thwart counterfeiters with nanocrystals

MIT researchers created anoparticles that come in a range of customizable colors, can be embedded invisibly just about anywhere, and can be authenticated using nothing more than an accessorized smartphone. (Learn More >>)

Targeting Cancer with a Triple Threat

MIT chemists have devised a new way to build nanoparticles that can carry and deliver precise ratios of three or more different drugs. (Learn More >>)

Popping nanoballoons to fight cancer

Developed by researchers at the University at Buffalo, these miniscule particles can deliver anti-cancer medications straight to the tumor itself, without causing unwanted damage along the way. (Learn More >>)

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