Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • May 22, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers have developed a new platform that can image single molecules in three dimensions. The platform uses spectroscopic single-molecule localization microscopy, a tool that can simultaneously capture the spatial information of single molecules and their spectroscopic signatures.

  • May 20, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers have discovered that a plant virus could deliver pesticide molecules deeper below the ground to places that are normally beyond their reach. This discovery could help farmers better manage difficult pests – such as parasitic nematodes, which wreak havoc on plant roots deep in the soil – with less pesticide.

  • May 20, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers have discovered that a plant virus could deliver pesticide molecules deeper below the ground to places that are normally beyond their reach. This discovery could help farmers better manage difficult pests – such as parasitic nematodes, which wreak havoc on plant roots deep in the soil – with less pesticide.

  • May 20, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists have shown that cube-shaped nanoparticles, or nanocubes, coated with single-stranded DNA chains assemble into an unusual “zigzag” arrangement that has never been observed before at the nanoscale or macroscale.

  • May 20, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists have shown that cube-shaped nanoparticles, or nanocubes, coated with single-stranded DNA chains assemble into an unusual “zigzag” arrangement that has never been observed before at the nanoscale or macroscale.

  • May 20, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists have shown that cube-shaped nanoparticles, or nanocubes, coated with single-stranded DNA chains assemble into an unusual “zigzag” arrangement that has never been observed before at the nanoscale or macroscale.

  • May 17, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers have created a novel dielectric material that could help manufacturers who are working on creating next-generation flexible electronics. Dielectrics are the polarized insulators in batteries and other devices that separate positive and negative electrodes. The most common dielectrics contain brittle metal oxides and are less adaptable as devices shrink or get more flexible, but the newly developed dielectric is, surprisingly, flexible.

  • May 17, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers have created a novel dielectric material that could help manufacturers who are working on creating next-generation flexible electronics. Dielectrics are the polarized insulators in batteries and other devices that separate positive and negative electrodes. The most common dielectrics contain brittle metal oxides and are less adaptable as devices shrink or get more flexible, but the newly developed dielectric is, surprisingly, flexible.

  • May 17, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation)

    Scientists have developed a method that can reposition atoms with a highly focused electron beam and control their exact location and bonding orientation. The advance, which uses nanotechnology tools, could ultimately lead to new ways of making quantum computing devices or sensors.

  • May 17, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation)

    Scientists have developed a method that can reposition atoms with a highly focused electron beam and control their exact location and bonding orientation. The advance, which uses nanotechnology tools, could ultimately lead to new ways of making quantum computing devices or sensors.

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