Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • June 03, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health)

    A team of researchers has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in three dimensions for regenerative medicine. Three-dimensional bioprinting is emerging as a promising method for rapidly fabricating cell-containing constructs for designing new, healthy, functional tissues.

  • June 03, 2019
    (Funded by the Office of Naval Research)

    The Rice University lab of chemist Andrew Barron works with bulk carbon nanotubes on a variety of projects. In an open-access paper in the Springer Nature journal SN Applied Sciences, the scientists provide a detailed description of an inexpensive method that they use to handle carbon nanotubes.

  • June 03, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed new techniques for labeling and retrieving data files in DNA-based information storage systems. DNA data storage technologies could theoretically store one billion times the amount of data stored in a conventional electronic device of comparable size.

  • May 30, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Researchers have demonstrated an innovative method for creating thin films to control the emission of single photons. This advance could help create reliable light-based quantum computing and quantum key distribution for cybersecurity.

  • May 30, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Electrospinning, a nanofiber fabrication method, can produce nanometer- to micrometer-diameter ceramic, polymer, and metallic fibers for tissue engineering, filtration, fuel cells and lithium batteries. To help companies design materials that are optimized for these applications, scientists are building a database that correlates electrospinning machine parameters with nanofiber properties.

  • May 29, 2019
    (Funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    Someday, doctors could introduce DNA nanostructures to the human body to diagnose diseases or deliver medications. But first, they must find a way to protect or repair the molecules when enzymes called nucleases degrade them. Researchers have now developed a self-repair process that could substantially extend the lifetime of DNA nanostructures.

  • May 29, 2019
    (Funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

    Researchers have developed a bioabsorbable wound dressing that builds on the blood-flow-staunching properties of chitosan - a natural material widely used in commercial wound dressings - by taking them nanoscale to boost their effectiveness and impact.

  • May 28, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    By using a gold nanoparticle instead of an inactivated virus, scientists have safely delivered gene-editing tools in lab models of HIV and inherited blood disorders. This advance could help make gene therapy more practical by simplifying the way gene-editing instructions are delivered to cells.

  • May 28, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have simplified the synthesis of a unique, nearly two-dimensional form of iron oxide with strong magnetic properties that is easy to stack atop other 2-D materials. The material, epsilon iron(III) oxide, shows promise as a building block for exotic nanoscale structures that could be useful for spintronic devices, electronic, or storage applications that take advantage of not only the charge of electrons but also their spin states.

     

  • May 24, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have developed a new methodology that can be used to create a class of stretchable polymer composites with enhanced electrical and thermal properties. These materials are promising candidates for use in soft robotics, self-healing electronics, and medical devices.

     

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