Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • March 13, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    By introducing defects into the structure of a metal-organic framework, Rice University researchers found they could increase the amount of toxic pollutants called perfluorooctanesulfonic acid that the metal-organic framework could hold, as well as the speed with which it could adsorb them from heavily polluted industrial wastewater.

  • March 13, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have demonstrated how nanoscale defects can enhance the properties of an ultrathin, so-called 2-D material.

  • March 08, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Office)

    Scientists have discovered an easier way to produce an infrared camera than the current methods. This novel method may one day lead to much more cost-effective infrared cameras, which, in turn, could enable infrared cameras for common consumer electronics and sensors to help autonomous cars see their surroundings more accurately.

  • March 07, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers at the University of Minnesota have combined graphene with nano-sized ribbons of gold to create an ultrasensitive biosensor that could help detect very small amounts of misfolded proteins, which are the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, Chronic Wasting Disease, and mad cow disease.

  • March 07, 2019
    (Funded by the US Army Research Office, the Office of Naval Research, the National Science Foundation, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Graphene holds promise for making next-generation electronics, so researchers are exploring ways to use graphene in circuits for flexible electronics and quantum computers. But removing the fragile material from a substrate on which it is grown is challenging. To address this issue, researchers have devised a fabrication technique that applies a wax coating to a graphene sheet, increasing its performance by a factor of four, compared to graphene made with a traditional polymer-protecting layer.

  • March 06, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    A research team has created a nanoscale “playground” on a chip that simulates the formation of exotic magnetic particles called monopoles. The study could unlock the secrets to ever-smaller, more powerful memory devices, microelectronics, and next-generation hard drives that employ the power of magnetic spin to store data.

  • March 06, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Electron microscopy experiments can only use a fraction of the possible information generated, because the microscope’s electron beam interacts with samples. Now, researchers have designed a new kind of electron detector that captures all of the information in these interactions. This new tool captures more images at a faster rate, revealing atomic-scale details across much larger areas than was possible before.

  • March 05, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Scientists have developed a user-friendly approach to creating 'theranostics' -- therapy combined with diagnostics -- that target specific tumors and diseases. They have developed a novel method to prepare cell-penetrating nanoparticles called 'metallocorrole/protein nanoparticles.' The theranostics could both survive longer in the body and better snipe disease targets.

  • March 05, 2019

    Researchers have developed a novel way to entangle two photons -- one with a wavelength suitable for quantum-computing devices and the other for fiber-optics transmissions. To create the entangled pairs, the researchers constructed a specially tailored optical "whispering gallery" -- a nano-sized silicon nitride resonator that steers light around a tiny racetrack. 

  • March 04, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Scientists at Harvard University are pursuing many novel approaches to fighting cancer, including nanoparticles attached to red blood cells that can escape detection by the body’s liver and spleen, which could pave the way for more effective, less toxic drug delivery.

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