Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • July 30, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago, in collaboration with their colleagues at the University of Hamburg in Germany, have imaged an exotic quantum particle that can be used as a building block for future qubits and eventually the realization of quantum computers.

  • July 30, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Rice University theoretical researchers have discovered that nanotubes with segregated sections of “zigzag” and “armchair” facets growing from a solid catalyst are far more energetically stable than a circular arrangement would be.

  • July 30, 2019
    (Funded by the Office of Naval Research, the Army Research Office, the National Science Foundation)

    Stanford physicists have developed a "quantum microphone" so sensitive that it can measure individual particles of sound, called phonons. The device could eventually lead to smaller, more efficient quantum computers that operate by manipulating sound rather than light.

  • July 30, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    A scientist, a multimedia artist, and a professor of computer music have been combining their expertise to convert x-ray scattering data of nanomaterial structures into sound.

  • July 26, 2019
    (Funded by the Office of Naval Research, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the National Science Foundation)

    A team of engineers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has found a new way to create single-chain protein nanostructures by using synthetic biology and protein-assembly techniques. In the future, these protein nanostructures could be used to improve sensing capabilities, speeding chemical reactions, in drug delivery and other applications.

  • July 26, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    Physicists at Stanford University have stumbled upon a novel form of magnetism, predicted but never seen before, that is generated when two honeycomb-shaped lattices of carbon are carefully stacked and rotated to a special angle. The authors suggest the magnetism, called orbital ferromagnetism, could prove useful for certain applications, such as quantum computing.

  • July 25, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have demonstrated that nanomedicines can be designed to interface with a natural detoxification process in the liver to improve their disease targeting while minimizing potential side effects.

  • July 25, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, the Harvard John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Sciences, and McGill University have developed a material that could speed up wound healing. The new material, called active adhesive dressing (AAD), is based on heat-responsive hydrogels that are mechanically active, stretchy, tough, highly adhesive, and antimicrobial.

  • July 24, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    Scientists at the University of Washington School of Medicine and the University of California San Francisco have created the first artificial protein switch that can work inside living cells to modify the cell's complex internal circuitry. The scientists have shown that this switch can be "programmed" to modify gene expression, redirect cellular traffic, degrade specific proteins, and control protein interactions. Once assembled by a cell, these switches measure eight nanometers on their longest side.

  • July 24, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers at Stanford University are designing a nanoscale photon diode -- a necessary component that could bring us closer to faster, more energy-efficient computers and communications that replace electricity with light.

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