Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • March 21, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology)

    Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have made ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that, thanks to a special type of shell, produce five times higher light intensity than do comparable LEDs based on a simpler shell design.

  • March 21, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration)

    Computer scientists at Caltech have designed DNA molecules that can carry out reprogrammable computations, for the first time creating so-called algorithmic self-assembly, in which the same "hardware" can be configured to run different "software." The system is analogous to a computer, but instead of using transistors and diodes, it uses molecules to represent a six-bit binary number as input, during computation, and as output.

  • March 21, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers from New York University have engineered nanoscale protein micelles capable of both delivering chemotherapeutic drugs and being tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The innovation falls into the category of "theranostics," meaning that it combines diagnostic capability and drug delivery, allowing researchers to administer therapy while also non-invasively monitoring the therapeutic progress and drastically reducing the need for surgical intervention.

  • March 20, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Physicists at the California Institute of Technology have designed a method that theoretically could levitate and propel objects using only light waves. The team believes that the method would lead to the development of a light-powered spacecraft that can travel to the nearest planet outside of the solar system.

  • March 19, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Using nanotechnology, University of Central Florida researchers have developed the first rapid detector for dopamine, a chemical that is believed to play a role in various diseases such as Parkinson's, depression and some cancers. The new technique requires only a few drops of blood, and results are available in minutes instead of hours, because no separate lab is necessary to process the sample.

  • March 19, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Army Research Office)

    Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a new way of measuring atomic-scale magnetic fields with great precision, not only up and down but sideways as well. The new tool could be useful in applications as diverse as mapping the electrical impulses inside a firing neuron, characterizing new magnetic materials, and probing exotic quantum-physical phenomena.

  • March 19, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Scientists have developed an approach to identify, quantify, and characterize titanium dioxide engineered nanoparticles found in surface waters, which paves the way for routine monitoring of engineered nanoparticles in the environment.

  • March 15, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation)

    A new system for synthesizing quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color, and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

  • March 15, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have developed a new biological sensor that could help clinicians better diagnose cancer and epilepsy. Biological sensors monitor small molecules, ions, and protons and are vital as medical diagnostic tools.

  • March 14, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency)

    Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have engineered living cells so they can act as a starting point for building composite materials. Using living cells as "materials scaffolds" could lead to a new class of materials, called engineered living materials, that might open the door to self-healing materials and other applications in bioelectronics, biosensing, and smart materials.

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