Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • June 10, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists have developed a technique that introduces carbon-hydrogen molecules into a single atomic layer of the semiconducting material tungsten disulfide, which dramatically changes the electronic properties of the material. The researchers say they can create new types of components for energy-efficient photoelectric devices and electronic circuits with this material.

  • June 07, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    Materials science researchers have discovered a new process for producing oxide perovskite crystals in flexible, free-standing layers. A two-dimensional rendition of this substance is intriguing to scientists and engineers because some two-dimensional materials have been shown to display high-temperature superconductivity and are prized as potential building blocks for quantum computing devices.

  • June 07, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Scientists have developed a highly efficient catalyst for extracting electrical energy from ethanol, an easy-to-store liquid fuel that can be generated from renewable resources. The chemical structure of the catalyst consists of a gold nanoparticle with platinum and iridium atoms on its surface.

  • June 06, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Scientists have been able to reverse multiple sclerosis symptoms in mice with a nanotechnology treatment derived from bone marrow stem cells. In past experiments, intravenously injected stem cells often got trapped in filter organs before reaching their target. For this study, the researchers avoided that problem by extracting nano-sized particles called exosomes from the stem cells and injecting them into mice with multiple sclerosis.

  • June 06, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers have found that a form of nanoscale corrosion is responsible for unpredictably decreasing the working life of steel pipes. The researchers were able to pin the root of the problem on a triple junction formed by a grain of cementite—a compound of carbon and iron—and two grains of ferrite, a type of iron.

  • June 05, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Researchers have discovered that the teeth of the deep-sea dragonfish are transparent because they have an unusually crystalline nanostructure mixed with amorphous regions. This discovery could inspire researchers who are trying to develop transparent ceramics.

  • June 05, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers have advanced the idea of using titanium dioxide nanoparticles stimulated by microwaves to trigger the death of cancer cells without damaging normal cells around them. The use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles activated by light and ultrasound to treat cancer has been studied extensively, but this advance marks the first time researchers have shown that these nanoparticles can be effectively activated by microwaves to destroy cancer cells.

  • June 04, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research)

    Scientists have devised a way to engineer strain when atomically thin crystals are grown over three-dimensional objects to make single-photon emitters for quantum information processing.

  • June 04, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Gold, silver, and copper are heavy metals, but scientists can now make them nearly as light as air—in a form so tiny it can ride on a mosquito's back. These ultra-low-density metal foams were created to improve the X-ray sources that are used in the world's most energetic laser system.

  • June 04, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Chemists have devised a potentially major improvement to both the speed and durability of smart glass by providing a better understanding of how the glass works at the nanoscale. Smart glass is an energy-efficient product that can slowly change between transparent and tinted at the flip of a switch and is found in newer windows of cars, buildings, and airplanes.

Pages