Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • September 18, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering have introduced the first universal adsorption model that accounts for detailed nanoparticle structural characteristics, metal composition and different adsorbates, making it possible to not only predict adsorption behavior on any metal nanoparticles but screen their stability, as well. This improvement will significantly accelerate nanomaterials design and avoid trial and error experimentation in the lab.

  • September 18, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)

    Just as the steam engine set the stage for the Industrial Revolution, and micro transistors sparked the digital age, nanoscale devices made from DNA are opening up a new era in bio-medical research and materials science.

  • September 18, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Platinum is one of the most commonly used catalysts for fuel cells, but its high cost has spurred research efforts to find ways to use smaller amounts of it while maintaining the same catalytic. Now researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have demonstrated that films of platinum only two atoms thick supported by graphene could enable fuel cell catalysts with unprecedented catalytic activity and longevity.

  • September 18, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research)

    Researchers at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and Harvard Medical School have developed a method that combines the team's DNA-powered imaging technology with a single-molecule labeling strategy at a desired location within synthetic nanostructures or intact cells. This approach could allow researchers to stimulate or inhibit the functions of individual molecules in real time and with very high resolution.

  • September 18, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Army Research Office)

    MIT engineers have developed a material that is 10 times blacker than anything that has previously been reported. The material is made from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, or CNTs — microscopic filaments of carbon, like a fuzzy forest of tiny trees, that the team grew on a surface of chlorine-etched aluminum foil. The foil captures at least 99.995% of any incoming light, making it the blackest material on record.

  • September 16, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers Sandia National Laboratories have developed a nanoantenna-enabled detector that can boost the signal of a thermal infrared camera by up to three times and improve image quality by reducing dark current — a major component of image noise — by 10 to 100 times. A nanoantenna is a nanoscale antenna-like structure that sends and transmits electromagnetic waves.

  • September 16, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown how a fuel cell can be built with monodisperse platinum-cobalt nanocrystals – a scientific advance that could pave the way for making fuel cell technology more stable and cost-effective.

  • September 13, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Researchers at Penn State have developed a field-effect transistor that is made of 2D materials and that is more energy efficient and produces less heat than field-effect transistors used in current computers. This new transistor is inspired by how the brain works and provides a range of probabilistic responses instead of “on” or “off” responses.

  • September 13, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    A Northwestern University research team has developed a new method for making catalysts from metal nanoparticles that could lead to better fuel cells. The researchers also discovered that the method can take spent catalysts and recycle them into active catalysts.

  • September 13, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Office of Naval Research)

    Scientists from Caltech, Georgia Tech, and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich have developed a metamaterial that can change shape in a tunable fashion. While most reconfigurable materials can toggle between two distinct states – the way a switch toggles on or off – the new material's shape can be finely tuned, adjusting its physical properties as desired. The material has potential applications in next-generation energy storage and bio-implantable micro-devices.

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