Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • August 13, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers at Rice University have developed biocompatible carbon nanotube fibers that can be used as electrical bridges that span across damaged heart tissue and successfully restore the atrioventricular conduction needed for proper pacing.

  • August 12, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Scientists at the University of Washington designed and tested an experimental system that uses light alone to actively shape and control thermal landscapes at the nanoscale. The researchers were successful in using near-infrared laser to actively heat two gold nanorod antennae to different temperatures.

  • August 12, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers at MIT describe a simple solution to create carbon nanotube-based single-photon emitters, which are known as fluorescent quantum defects, at room temperature.

  • August 12, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers at Caltech have directly observed and studied the "magic angle" for stacked sheets of graphene using a scanning tunneling microscope that can image electronic properties at atomic-length scales.

  • August 12, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    An international team of researchers uses the self-assembly properties of block co-polymers to produce a highly selective and biofouling-resistant nanoporous filter. The internally and externally cross-linked nanofibrils surrounded by a continuous aqueous medium produces a mechanically robust material that resembles an inverted strainer design.

  • August 12, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Scientists have created unique two-dimensional flakes with two distinct personalities: molybdenum diselenide on one side of a sharp divide with rhenium diselenide on the other. The materials show promise for optoelectronics.

  • August 09, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have grown simplified organs, known as organoids, with fully integrated sensors. These so-called cyborg organoids offer a rare glimpse into the early stages of organ development and could be used to test and monitor patient-specific drug treatments and for transplantations.

  • August 09, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    To collect electricity in a solar cell or inject electricity for a display, you need a conductive contact, like a metal, but you also need to be able to let light in (for solar cells) or out (for displays). Metal is opaque, so the current techniques use metal oxides, most often indium tin oxide, as the conductive contact. Because supplies of indium tin oxide are limited, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have turned to ordered metal nanowire meshes that use more common elements and provide high transmissivity and high electrical connectivity.

  • August 09, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture)

    A team of environmental scientists has, for the first time, used a dynamic, two-step process to completely degrade a common flame-retardant chemical, making it nontoxic.

  • August 09, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have found that spraying a gel on the internal tissues of animals after cardiac surgery greatly reduces fibrous bands that form between internal organs and tissues. Such fibrous bands can cause serious, even fatal, complications. The gel, developed to deliver medications, was far more effective than materials currently on the market, the researchers said.

Pages