Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • April 03, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    DNA nanotechnology uses DNA molecules as programmable "Legos" to assemble nanostructures. But the structure of DNA is very simple and lacks the diversity of proteins, while the assembly of proteins is difficult to control with the precision of DNA. How about combining both DNA and proteins? Scientists have built a cage made of protein and DNA building blocks by using covalent bonds between them.

  • April 02, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    By using an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, scientists were able to monitor real-time atom rearrangement during the synthesis of intermetallic nanoparticles made of platinum-tin alloy. These nanoparticles have applications in energy-efficient fuel conversion and biofuel production.

  • April 01, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation)

    A prototype wearable device, tested in animal models, can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient's blood. Developed by a team of engineers and doctors, this device could help doctors diagnose and treat cancer more effectively.

  • April 01, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Leukemia cells have an impaired ability to get rid of iron. A nanoparticle drug called ferumoxytol delivers additional iron to these cells. The excess iron causes the leukemia cells to die. Ferumoxytol is already approved to treat anemia, so researchers know the drug is safe.

  • March 29, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Research Laboratory)

    Researchers have developed tiny optical elements from metal nanoparticles and a polymer that one day could replace traditional refractive lenses to realize portable imaging systems and optoelectronic devices. The flat and versatile lens has a thickness 100 times smaller than the width of a human hair.

  • March 28, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers have developed a new class of biomaterial for a nanovaccine that boosted immunity in mice with metabolic disorders linked to gut bacteria. Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that includes obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. Nanovaccines have been found to induce stronger immunity than traditional soluble vaccines in pre-clinical models.

  • March 28, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    Researchers have discovered that radiation therapy may increase the uptake of therapeutic nanoparticles by glioblastomas – the most aggressive type of brain tumor – in mice. The team demonstrated that a brief burst of radiation was able to increase uptake of the nanoparticles up to five-fold, activating the immune response at the tumor site and prolonging survival.

  • March 27, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Purdue University engineers have built a tiny, flexible sensor that is faster and more precise than past attempts at tracking a chemical called glutamate. The sensor, an implantable device on the spinal cord, could be used to monitor whether a drug for neurotrauma or brain disease is working.

  • March 27, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Engineers and physicists from Tufts University have devised a low-cost membrane that can rapidly filter oil from water and oil mixtures without the membrane getting fouled. This advance could be a game changer in the battle against pollution.

  • March 26, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the National Science Foundation)

    A research team has developed a flexible, wood-based membrane that someday could turn body heat into electricity.

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