Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • November 29, 2018
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have measured an ultrananocrystalline diamond coating prized for its hard yet smooth properties and have shown that it is far rougher than previously believed. Their findings could help researchers better predict how surface topography affects surface properties for materials used in diverse environments from microsurgery and engines to satellite housings or spacecraft.

  • November 26, 2018
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    A new candidate HIV vaccine surmounts technical hurdles that stymied previous vaccine efforts and stimulates a powerful anti-HIV antibody response in animal tests. The new vaccine strategy is based on the HIV envelope protein, a complex, shape-shifting molecule that has been notoriously difficult to produce in vaccines in a way that induces useful immunity to HIV.

  • November 26, 2018
    (Funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology)

    Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have conducted simulations suggesting that graphene, in addition to its many other useful features, can be modified with special pores to act as a tunable filter or strainer for ions (charged atoms) in a liquid. 

  • November 21, 2018
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have shown a way to use graphene oxide to add some backbone to hydrogel materials made from alginate, a natural material derived from seaweed that is currently used in a variety of biomedical applications.

  • November 21, 2018
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    Imagine a world where cell phones and laptops can be charged in a matter of minutes instead of hours, rolled up and stored in your pocket, or dropped without sustaining any damage. To make this world a reality, scientists have patented an idea to improve battery performance by introducing tapers into the polymer membrane electrolytes that allow the lithium ions inside the battery to travel back and forth faster.

  • November 19, 2018
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have developed a single-layer surface of nanostructures that can correct chromatic aberrations (which cause lenses to focus different wavelengths of light in different spots) across the visible spectrum and can be incorporated into commercial optical systems, from simple lenses to high-end microscopes. 

  • November 19, 2018
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Physicists have found the first evidence of a two-dimensional material that can become a magnetic topological insulator even when it is not placed in a magnetic field.

  • November 16, 2018
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers have discovered how to extend the useful life of "superalloys" by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors.

  • November 15, 2018
    (Funded by the Office of Naval Research)

    Researchers have provided new results on a microscopic nanotube-sensing film called a “smart skin,” which promises to reveal whether structures like bridges or aircraft have been deformed by stress-inducing events or regular wear and tear.

  • November 15, 2018
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    First yeast biohybrid system using an adaptable light-harvesting semiconductor approach opens the door to more efficient and versatile biomanufacturing.

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