Press Releases: Research Funded by Agencies Participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative

The following press releases describe the results of research activities that are funded by Federal agencies that participate in the National Nanotechnology Initiative.
  • July 09, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation)

    In work that could lead to new applications for a new class of nanomaterials known as MXenes, researchers from Texas A&M University have discovered a simple and inexpensive way to prevent the materials' rapid degradation.

  • July 09, 2019
    (Funded by the Office of Naval Research, the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency)

    Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory have developed a new technique that could enable future advancements in quantum technology. The technique squeezes quantum dots, tiny particles made of thousands of atoms, to emit single photons (individual particles of light) with precisely the same color and with positions that can be less than a millionth of a meter apart.

  • July 08, 2019
    (Funded by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research)

    Researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have developed a highly compact, portable camera that can image polarization in a single shot. The miniature camera — about the size of a thumb — could find a place in the vision systems of autonomous vehicles, onboard planes or satellites to study atmospheric chemistry, or be used to detect camouflaged objects.

  • July 08, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research)

    Scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials – a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory – have come up with a technique for optimizing the activity of zinc oxide nanowires. Their technique involves chemically treating the surface of the nanowires in such a way that they can be uniformly coated with an ultrathin film of titanium dioxide, which acts as both a catalyst and protective layer.

  • July 03, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that highly porous materials can absorb key components of a class of toxic chemicals found in 43 U.S. states. These nano-sized porous materials, called metal-organic frameworks, can quickly take up fluorinated compounds that were widely used in firefighting foam and non-stick cookware.

  • July 03, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    By energizing precursor molecules using a tiny, high-energy supersonic jet of inert gas, researchers have dramatically accelerated the fabrication of nanostructures. The technique allows nanostructures to be made at rates approaching what would be expected in the liquid phase, which could make these nanostructures practical for use in magnetic memory, high-frequency antennas, and quantum communication devices.

  • July 02, 2019
    (Funded by the National Institutes of Health)

    In a major collaborative effort, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University and the University of Nebraska Medical Center have for the first time eliminated replication-competent HIV-1 DNA – the virus responsible for AIDS – from the genomes of living animals. The study marks a critical step toward the development of a possible cure for human HIV infection.

  • July 02, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers from the University of Vermont, Boston University, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have demonstrated a new experimental capability for watching thin film growth in real-time. The researchers were able to produce a "movie" of thin film growth that depicts the process more accurately than traditional techniques can.

  • July 02, 2019
    (Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy)

    Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have pioneered cutting-edge methods to study the formation of calcium carbonate in saline water. Their results suggest that we may have been overestimating how fast calcium carbonate forms in saline environments.

  • July 01, 2019
    (Funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research and the National Science Foundation)

    Researchers have presented an update to their original nanoscale device for intracellular recording, the first nanotechnology developed to record electrical chatter inside a living cell. The scientists have used many copies of the updated nanoscale device to record intracellular signals in neural and cardiac cells in culture with the same level of precision as the device’s biggest competitor: patch clamp electrodes.

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