PCAST: Report to the President and Congress on the Fourth Assessment of the National Nanotechnology Initiative (2012)

Subject Area:
External Evaluations of the NNI
Author: Executive Office of the President; President's Council of Advisors of Science and Technology (PCAST)
Publication Date: Apr. 27 2012

Description:

The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) is a crosscutting Federal program designed to coordinate U.S. investment in research and development (R&D) activities in nanoscale science, engineering, technology, and related efforts across 25 agencies and programs. This is the fourth review of the NNI by the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) since the council was designated in 2004 as the National Nanotechnology Advisory Panel tasked with reviewing the initiative.

The Federal Government has proposed $1.8 billion of funding in fiscal year (FY) 2013 for 15 agencies with budgets dedicated to nanotechnology research and development. The FY 2013 request will represent total funding of $18 billion over the life of the Initiative. Nearly 75 percent of this funding goes to three Program Component Areas: Fundamental Nanoscale Phenomena and Processes, Nanomaterials, and Nanoscale Devices and Systems. The NNI continues to support a strong and growing portfolio of research on the societal implications of nanotechnology, nanotechnology education, and public outreach. The President’s 2013 budget includes a total of $306 million—a 24-percent increase compared to 2011 actual spending—for three Nanotechnology Signature Initiatives: Nanotechnology for Solar Energy Collection and Conversion; Sustainable Nanomanufacturing: Creating the Industries of the Future; and Nanoelectronics for 2020 and Beyond. These initiatives foster meaningful interagency collaboration and serve as springboards for the rapid advancement of nanoscience and technology toward commercialization.


Nanotechnology Fact

Nanoscale materials have been used for over a millennium. For example, nanoscale gold was used in stained glass in Medieval Europe and nanotubes were found in blades of swords made in Damascus. However, ten centuries passed before high-powered microscopes were invented, allowing us to see things at the nanoscale and begin working with materials at the nanoscale.

Nanotechnology as we now know it began about 30 years ago, when our tools to image and measure extended into the nanoscale. Around the turn of the millennium, government research managers in the United States and other countries observed that physicists, biologists, chemists, electrical engineers, optical engineers, and materials scientists were working on overlapping issues emerging at the nanoscale. In 2000, the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) was created to help these researchers benefit from each other’s insights and accelerate the technology’s development.

To learn more, see What is Nanotechnology?

Stay Connected with the NNI

Sign up for Email Alerts and Updates.

NNI-Sponsored Contests:

Stay tuned for info on the next cycles!

student video contest logoenvisionano