United States International Trade Commission (USITC)

The United States International Trade Commission (USITC) is an independent, quasi judicial Federal agency with broad investigative responsibilities on matters of trade. The Commission (1) administers U.S. trade remedy laws within its mandate in a fair and objective manner; (2) provides the President, The U.S. Trade Representative and Congress with independent analysis, information, and support on matters of tariffs, international trade, and U.S. competitiveness; and (3) maintains the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTS).

Research
Focus

The USITC serves as a federal resource where trade data and other trade policy-related information are gathered and analyzed. The information and analysis are provided to the President, the Office of the United States Trade Representative, and the Congress to contribute to the development of sound and informed U.S. trade policy. The USITC makes most of its information and analysis available to the public to promote understanding of international trade issues.

Key
Contacts

Elizabeth R. Nesbitt, International Trade Analyst for Biotechnology and Nanotechnology
Office of Industries
T: 202-205-3355
elizabeth.nesbitt(at)usitc.gov

Peg O'Laughlin
Office of External Relations
T: 202-205-1819
margaret.olaughlin(at)usitc.gov


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Nanotechnology Fact

Nanoscale materials have been used for over a millenium. For example, nanoscale gold was used in stained glass in Medieval Europe and nanotubes were found in blades of swords made in Damascus. However, ten centuries passed before high-powered microscopes were invented, allowing us to see things at the nanoscale and begin working with materials at the nanoscale.

Nanotechnology as we now know it began about 30 years ago, when our tools to image and measure extended into the nanoscale. Around the turn of the millennium, government research managers in the United States and other countries observed that physicists, biologists, chemists, electrical engineers, optical engineers, and materials scientists were working on overlapping issues emerging at the nanoscale. In 2000, the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) was created to help these researchers benefit from each other’s insights and accelerate the technology’s development.

To learn more, see What is Nanotechnology?